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ultrafacts:

thescoon:

sir-hathaway:

gryffinpoor:

dudemanbropants:

gryffinpoor:

thepreciousthing:

the-ordinary-nerd:

ask-or-rp-with-will-petrisous:

squad16:

finalellipsis:

bestnatesmithever:

What if it bites me and it dies?

that means you’re poisonous. jesus christ, nate, learn to read.

What if it bites itself and I die?

It’s voodoo.

What if it bites me and someone else dies?

That’s correlation, not causation.

what if we bite each other and neither of us die

that’s kinky

oh my god

this is still my favorite text post collaboration ever

I rarely reblog stuff like this, but this is so damn clever and hilarious.

(Source) for the fact in the picture

plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.
plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.
Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 
It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.
If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.

plannedparenthoodla:

Parents, guardians, and trusted adults can be a great resources for your questions about sexuality and sexual health.

Think about it: they have bodies and they’ve been teenagers, too. So chances are they can give you some real life advice. And if they don’t know the answers to your questions, they can help you find them. 

It might feel weird to bring up the changes in your body with your parent or other trusted adults, but they care about you and want to help.

If you feel like you really can’t talk to your parent about what’s going on with your body, find an adult you trust — a sibling, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a teacher, a doctor, or someone else — to help you out with your questions.

I feel like my first night of college was a total success. Got some action, made three new friends, got invited to a real party, and went to steak and shake with my new friends. I’ve got high hopes for this year :)

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